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Nunes Must Go: #RemoveNunes: Twitter Funnies

“Death of Stalin”: Satirical Film Not to be Distributed in Russia: Denies it is Censorship

© filmpro.ru

KAZAN, January 25. /TASS/. Withdrawing of the distribution certificate for The Death of Stalin movie has nothing to do with censorship, Russian Presidential Spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters.

“I don’t agree that it is a manifestation of censorship,” he said.

Russian Culture Ministry yanks distribution certificate for The Death of Stalin

January 23, 18:52UTC+3

 

The Death of Stalin, a British-French political satire film directed by Armando Iannucci, is based on a graphic novel by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin

MOSCOW, January 23. /TASS/. The Russian Cultural Ministry has decided to withdraw the distribution certificate for the British-French political satire film The Death of Stalin, Acting Director of the ministry’s Cinema Department Olga Lyubimova told TASS on Tuesday.

On Monday, a public screening of the picture took place, attended by film industry figures, State Duma (lower house of parliament) MPs, representatives of the Russian Historical Society as well as members of the Culture Ministry’s Public Board. According to the Board’s head Yuri Polyakov, the movie should not be screened in Russia as it seems to be a tool for “ideological struggle.” He pointed out that, “nobody spoke out in favor of the film as a work of art.” The movie industry people who watched the flick requested the Culture Ministry yank its distribution credentials.

“The distribution certificate for The Death of Stalin has been withdrawn,” a spokesperson for the Culture Ministry said.

A group of the Russian Culture Ministry’s lawyers earlier requested Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky yank the distribution certificate for The Death of Stalin, citing the film’s extremist nature.

“The Death of Stalin is aimed at inciting hatred and enmity, violating the dignity of the Russian (Soviet) people, promoting ethnic and social inferiority, which points to the movie’s extremist nature,” the attorneys said. “According to the rules of issuance and withdrawal of film distribution credentials, such a certificate must be withdrawn in case a movie contains information the dissemination of which is prohibited by Russian legislation,” the address says.

According to the lawyers, the film portrays some historical characters, including Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, in a distorted way. “Zhukov is portrayed as a militant comedian, while he was actually a prominent commander, a gifted strategist and a marshal of the Soviet Union, who made a great contribution to our army’s victory in the Great Patriotic War, so his name is inextricably linked to the great Victory. However, the movie shows no respect for our history and the memory of previous generations,” the address stressed.

“We are confident that the movie was made to distort our country’s past so that the thought of the 1950s Soviet Union makes people feel only terror and disgust,” they added.

The Death of Stalin, a British-French political satire film directed by Armando Iannucci, is based on a graphic novel by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin. The Russian release of the picture, which premiered worldwide in September 2017, is due for release January 25. The movie is centered on the pursuit for power in the USSR following the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953. The film stars Steve Buscemi, Jason Isaacs and Olga Kurilenko to name a few.

Gorilla Channel Highlights: Twitter Funnies

As folks killed time waiting for the release of Fire and Fury, this parody suddenly appeared on Twitter, leading to some very fun posts imagining just what a Gorilla Channel might be like.

Political Irony & Sarcasm on Twitter: New Study Finds it Appeals to Followers of India’s ‘Twitter-in-chief’

“We try and explain what makes him popular,” said Joyojeet Pal, U-M assistant professor of information. “Modi’s irony provides a form of political spectacle and resonated on social media as shown by high retweeting of his sarcastically worded messages.”

India’s ‘Twitter-in-chief’: Decoding Modi’s social media brand

ANN ARBOR—With 36 million followers on Twitter, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is the world’s No. 2 most popular politician in the Twittersphere after Donald Trump.

The way Modi uses sarcasm against his opponents is the focus of a new University of Michigan School of Information study that analyzed more than 9,000 tweets by Modi over a six-year period.

“We try and explain what makes him popular,” said Joyojeet Pal, U-M assistant professor of information. “Modi’s irony provides a form of political spectacle and resonated on social media as shown by high retweeting of his sarcastically worded messages.”

Published in the International Journal of Communication, the study examined the Twitter account of Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) to show how he used political irony and sarcasm to become broadly appealing and refashion his political style.

The researchers coded the tweets into nine broad themes: cricket, Rahul Gandhi (opposition leader), entertainment, sarcasm, corruption, development, foreign affairs, Hinduism, and science and technology.

After coding, they found that sarcastic tweets were closely concentrated around election and campaigning cycles.”

In many of Modi’s tweets during national elections, he referred to the main opposition party as corrupt and Ghandi, its rising leader who also has a huge Twitter following, as “Rahul Baba” or “Shahzada (prince).”

By using humor and sarcasm, he was signaling that the party was not in touch with its roots and letting his own followers get the inside joke, the researchers said.

Here is an example of a Modi tweet, which garnered 2,545 retweets: “The way Rahul Baba is making statements with a dash of comedy in them, I think the TV show of Kapil Sharma may soon have to shut shop.”

According to the U-M researchers, Modi’s use of sarcasm builds on a longer tradition of slogan humor during political rallies.

“There are plenty of attacks, rhetoric, cleverly worded jibes and jokes,” Pal said.

Although social media did not reach many of the traditional rural and peri-urban upper caste Hindu voters of Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party, they extended the prime minister’s appeal to a new young urban constituency.

“After the election, the sarcasm and mention of Gandhi disappears,” Pal said. “Instead, the celebrity mentions and tweets about foreign policy increase dramatically.”

According to the researchers, the sarcasm helped separate Hindutva-oriented content, which is traditionally more divisive than the pan-Indian patriotic rhetoric of “India First,” through which Modi has gained a more secular standing.

“The power of Modi’s message is in the juxtaposition of his past as a train station tea-seller alongside his present as a selfie-clicking leader of a strong aspirational but fundamentally nationalist state,” Pal said. “Sarcasm is as much a message from Modi as it is a message about him.”

Full study:

http://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/view/6705/2163